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January 28th, 2016

JROTC – A Recruitment Tool In 18 New York City High Schools

We in the Granny Peace Brigade do not think military recruiters should be inside New York City high schools, but unfortunately they are — in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) programs at eighteen NYC high schools. Eighteen? Yes there are eighteen JROTC programs in NYC — eighteen too many.

JROTC is a Federal program sponsored by the United States Armed Forces in high schools across the United States and United States military bases across the world.

One goal of the JROTC program is to recruit high school students. And you don’t have to believe us on that. The goal is stated clearly on page three of Policy Memorandum 50 – U.S. Army Recruiting Command (USAREC) Partnership Initiatives:

JROTC SAI and AI will:.

a. Actively assist cadets who want to enlist in the military. Emphasize service in the U.S. Army (all components).

b. Facilitate recruiter access to cadets in JROTC program and to the entire student body.

c. Encourage college bound cadets to enroll in SROTC.

d. Work closely with high school guidance counselors to sell the Army story. Encourage them to display RPIs and advertising material and make sure they know how to obtain information on Army opportunities, including SROTC scholarships.

The intent of these partnership initiatives is to promote a synergistic effort of all Army assets, maximize recruiting efforts, exchange quality referrals, and educate all on both recruiting and ROTC programs and benefits.

The eighteen schools with JROTC programs are:

  1. Hs Of Graphic Communication ArtsGraphics Educational Campus 430 W. 49th St (M625)
  2. Hs For Health Careers And Science – 459 Audubon Ave (M468)
  3. De Witt Clinton Educationa Campus 100 West Mosholu Parkway South   (X440)
  4. Harry S. Truman Hs – Educational Campus 750 Baychester Ave (X455
  5. Bronx High School For Law And Community Service Theodore Rosevelt Campus – 500 East Fordham Road (X439)
  6. Morris Academy For Collaborative Studies  Morris Educational Campus – 1100 Boston Road (X297)
  7. Francis Lewis Hs – 58-20 Utopia Parkway (Q430)
  8. Long Island City Hs – 14030 Broadway  (Q450)
  9. John Bowne Hs – 63-25 Main St.  (Q425)
  10. Aviation Career And Technical Hs – 45-30 36th St.     (Q610)
  11. Franklin K. Lane Hs – 999 Jamaica Avenue (K420)
  12. Performing Arts And Technology Hs 400 Pennsylvania Ave (K502)
  13. Fort Hamilton Hs – 8301 Shore Road (K490)
  14. Port Richmond Hs – 35 St. Josephs Ave (R445)
  15. Curtis Hs – 105 Hamilton Ave (R450)
  16. The Michael J. Petrides School – 715 Ocean Terrace (R080)
  17. Susan E. Wagner Hs – 1200 Manor Road (R460)
  18. Tottenville Hs -100 Luten Ave (R455)

We’ve got work to do. Please join us in our campaign against militarization and recruitment in New York City High Schools.

– Eva-Lee Baird
for the Granny Peace Brigade

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4 comments to JROTC – A Recruitment Tool In 18 New York City High Schools

  • […] JROTC – A Recruitment Tool In 18 New York City High Schools […]

  • […] Peace Action, was at City Hall for the third time this year (2016) demanding that  funding for the Junior Reserve Officers training Corps (JROTC) program, in 18 NYC high schools, not be approved. The Mayor’s Education Expense Budget, 2016-2017, includes an estimated $1.5 […]

  • Wesley

    This is not necessarily true! This was 17 years ago…

  • Doc Riley A.

    Will all due respect, you seem to be very outdated in your facts. The memorandum you cite is from 17 years ago. That is not necessarily the truth now. Junior ROTC is a program that focuses on citizenship and personal development. Every child is a STUDENT before a cadet. That’s the rule.

    In the first year, students are taught basic disciplines and drill & ceremony. Simple disciplines like that help with developing other things, like time management or other useful skills for college. There is also a service-learning project at the end of the year. Service-learning is like community service, except it addresses a need of the community AND lets people apply and develop what they learn in a classroom. It helps students connect with people and learn to work as a team.

    In the second year, students are taught about first aid, an important skill in emergency situations, and civics. This helps in the event of a medical emergency. The students are instructed on how to perform CPR, create splints, tourniquets, etc. These are skills that can save lives. Civics help with understanding rights and responsibilities as a citizen. In fact, parts of the curriculum also appears in US History classes. It can aid students in studying for regents exams.

    In the third year, students are taught about finance and college. Not many schools give as much information and instruction on the college process or how to invest without taking an economics class. Junior ROTC covers all of this. Students are also taught how to counsel others. Imagine that you see a worker or another student crying one day, but they won’t tell you what’s wrong. Students can apply their counseling skills and help get to the bottom of the problem and suggest ways to solve it or help.

    In the fourth year, students take up leadership positions in their “battalion” and help keep things running smoothly in the classes and ensuring every student under their wing is performing to the best of their ability. Students have to solve real problems and communicate. It requires good decision-making skills and critical thinking.

    This is IN ADDITION to having uniform inspections to ensure students are maintaining a certain level of discipline and hygiene and having physical training to make sure students are staying healthy and active. There is no other program in NYC, possible even the United States, that combines ALL of these benefits into one cohesive program. Students are encouraged to go to college, but, only if they ALREADY WANT to go to the military, receive support and instruction in that regard. That’s where recruiters may come in and talk to students who are interested or give information to them about service. Students aren’t pushed into doing anything they don’t want to do. They are informed about some benefits of SROTC or academies, but that is very little. They can ask for more information if they are interested.

    Not to mention that students are required to maintain a minimum GPA to remain in Junior ROTC. It does not try to distract from schoolwork and studies. Service to the US Army isn’t emphasized. Service to the US PEOPLE is emphasized. Doing what is morally right is emphasized.

    Please stop using a memorandum from 15+ years ago (a time that was very different from the present) to try and shut down one of the greatest programs I have ever been in. The Granny Peace Brigade is misinformed. Please do more research on the program and stop trying to take it away.

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